They say ‘life is too short to drink bad coffee’. No matter what brewing method you use at home, you can improve your brews by following these coffee tips.

General Tips
Fresh Coffee Buy whole bean coffee. In general, brew within 30 days of the roast date on the bag.
Storage Store your coffee in a cool, dark place, sealed in an airtight container or zip lock bag. Never put your coffee in the fridge or freezer.
Grind your own Always buy whole bean coffee and grind just before use. As soon as coffee is ground, it begins to lose its flavour and aroma. When choosing a grinder for home (whether a hand grinder or electric) purchase a burr grinder rather than a blade grinder. Burr grinders produce a more even grind size which helps to ensure an even extraction for more delicious tasting coffee.
Filtered Water The quality of your water will directly affect the quality of your coffee.Water that tastes or smells off (e.g., chlorine, sulfur, iron) will inevitably produce off notes in your brew. Distilled water won’t yield a full extraction. Use filtered tap or spring water, and always fill your kettle with fresh water before boiling rather than reboiling ‘old’ water.
Brewing Rules
Filter Choose a clean filter that will not impart flavour taints. If you are using paper filters, pre-rinse with hot water before brewing to remove and ‘paper’ taste. if using metal filters, make sure they are rinsed before use to remove any soap residue. Be extra careful with cloth filters as they can go mouldy very easy, and need to be replaced frequently.
Temperature Coffee should be brewed around 95°C. Be sure to pre-heat your brewing equipment with hot water so that you do not get significantly heat loss during the brewing duration. Ideally, use a thermometer to measure your water temperature before brewing, or a temperature controlled kettle.
Brew Ratios The ‘golden cup’ ratio is a good starting point. The ratio is 60g of coffee for every 1000g of water.
Time Use a timer to time your brews. Brewing time depends on the brewing method. The coarser the grind needed, the longer the brewing times tend to be. For example, a plunger will be 5 minutes, while a pour over or Aeropress will be 2:30 minutes.
Grind In general, the coarser the grind needed, the longer the brewing times tend to be. For example, a plunger will be 5 minutes, while a pour over or Aeropress will be 2:30 minutes. Experiment. Dial in to balance sweetness, flavour, and body without under or over-extracting and introducing exagerated acidity or bitterness.